A Clockwork Orange

Enjoyed More Editions Anthony Burgess ✓ A Clockwork Orange☆ womens studies ☆ Free Download – passionbusiness.co.uk
  • Mass Market Paperback
  • 306 pages
  • A Clockwork Orange
  • Anthony Burgess
  • English
  • 23 June 2018
  • 0141197536

About the Author: Anthony Burgess

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the A Clockwork Orange book, this is one of the most wanted Anthony Burgess author readers around the world.


A Clockwork Orange This is a fully restored edition of Anthony Burgess original text of A Clockwork Orange, with a glossary of the teen slang Nadsat , explanatory notes, pages from the original typescript, interviews, articles and reviewsIt is a horrorshow storyFifteen year old Alex likes lashings of ultraviolence He and his gang of friends rob, kill and rape their way through a nightmarish future, until the State puts a stop to his riotous excesses But what will his re education mean A dystopian horror, a black comedy, an exploration of choice, A Clockwork Orange is also a work of exuberant invention which created a new language for its characters This critical edition restores the text of the novel as Anthony Burgess originally wrote it, and includes a glossary of the teen slang Nadsat , explanatory notes, pages from the original typescript, interviews, articles and reviews, shedding light on the enduring fascination of the novel s sweet and juicy criminality Anthony Burgess was born in Manchester in 1917 and educated at Xaverian College and Manchester University.He spent six years in the British Army before becoming a schoolmaster and colonial education officer in Malaya and Brunei After the success of his Malayan Trilogy, he became a full time writer in 1959 His books have been published all over the world, and they include The Complete Enderby, Nothing Like the Sun, Napoleon Symphony, Tremor of Intent, Earthly Powers and A Dead Man in Deptford Anthony Burgess died in London in 1993 Andrew Biswell is the Professor of Modern Literature at Manchester Metropolitan University and the Director of the International Anthony Burgess Foundation His publications include a biography, The Real Life of Anthony Burgess, which won the Portico Prize in 2006 He is currently editing the letters and short stories of Anthony Burgess. New Download [ A Clockwork Orange ] By [ Anthony Burgess ] – passionbusiness.co.uk

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15 thoughts on “A Clockwork Orange

  1. Martine says:

    A Clockwork Orange is one of those books which everyone has heard of but which few people have actually read mostly, I think, because it is preceded by a reputation of shocking ultra violence I m not going to deny here that the book contains violence It features lengthy descriptions of heinous crimes, and they re vivid descriptions, full of excitement Burgess later wrote in his autobiography I was sickened by my own excitement at setting it down Yet it does not glorify violence, nor A Clockwork Orange is one of those books which everyone has heard of but which few people have actually read mostly, I think, because it is preceded by a reputation of shocking ultra violence I m not going to deny here that the book contains violence It features lengthy descriptions of heinous crimes, and they re vivid descriptions, full of excitement Burgess later wrote in his autobiography I was sickened by my own excitement at setting it down Yet it does not glorify violence, nor is it a book about violence per se Rather it s an exploration of the morality of free will Of whether it is better to choose to be bad than to be conditioned to be good Of alienation and how to deal with the excesses to which such alienation may lead And ultimately, of one man s decision to say goodbye to all that At least in the UK version The American version, on which Stanley Kubrick s film ...

  2. Cecily says:

    How to review an infamous book about which so much has already been said By avoiding reading others thoughts until I ve written mine.There are horrors in this book, but there is beauty too, and so much to think about The ends of the book justify the means of its execution, even if the same is not true of what happens in the story.Book vs Film, and Omission of Final ChapterI saw the film first, and read the book shortly afterwards Usually a bad idea, but in this case, being familiar with the How to review an infamous book about which so much has already been said By avoiding reading others thoughts until I ve written mine.There are horrors in this book, but there is beauty too, and so much to think about The ends of the book justify the means of its execution, even if the same is not true of what happens in the story.Book vs Film, and Omission of Final ChapterI saw the film first, and read the book shortly afterwards Usually a bad idea, but in this case, being familiar with the plot and the Nadsat slang made it easier to relax if that s an appropriate word, given some of the horrors to...

  3. Paul Bryant says:

    In 1960 Anthony Burgess was 43 and had written 4 novels and had a proper job teaching in the British Colonial Service in Malaya and Brunei Then he had a collapse and the story gets complicated But I like the first cool version AB told, which was that he was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour and given a year to live Since as you know he lived a further 33 years, we may conclude the doctors were not entirely correct However the doctor tells you you have a year to live what do you d In 1960 Anthony Burgess was 43 and had written 4 novels and had a proper job teaching in the British Colonial Service in Malaya and Brunei Then he had a collapse and the story gets complicated But I like the first cool version AB told, which was that he was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour and given a year to live Since as you know he lived a further 33 years, we may conclude the doctors were not entirely correct However the doctor tells you you have a year to live what do you do Lapse into a major depression Get drunk and stay drunk Buy a Harley davidson Not if you were Anthony Burgess Uxorious regard for his wife s future security bade him to place his arse on a chair in the unpleasing English seaside town of Hove and type out five and a half novels in the one year left to h...

  4. Lyn says:

    What s it going to be then, eh A linguistic adventure, O my brothers I had seen the Kubrick film and so reading the novella was on the list I very much enjoyed it, was surprised to learn that American publishers and Kubrick had omitted the crucial last chapter that provides some moral denouement to the ultra violence.As disturbingly good as this is, one aspect that always comes back to me is Burgess creation of and use of the Nadsat language This provides color and mystery to the narrativ What s it going to be then, eh A linguistic adventure, O my brothers I had seen the Kubrick film and so reading the novella was on the list I very much enjoyed it, was surprised to learn that American publishers and Kubrick had omitted the crucial last chapter that provides some moral denouement to the ultra violence.As disturbingly good as this is, one aspect that always comes back to me is Burgess creation of and use of the Nadsat language This provides color and mystery to the narrative and it is noteworthy that Burgess intent was to soften the blow of the violent themes of the book 2018 addendum it is a testament to great literature that a reader recalls the work years later and this is a book about which I frequently think This is a book that, for me at least, is connected to the Stanley Kubrick fil...

  5. Sean Barrs the Bookdragon says:

    Rebellion can take on many forms and inA Clockwork Orangeit takes on the form of language the spoken word All societies have their constraints, though breaking through them is often difficult What the poor disaffected youth do here is create their own system of communication that is so utterly theirs. Every word carries history, and by destroying such words the youngster are proposing a break from tradition they are proposing something new This idea is captured when they attack the b Rebellion can take on many forms and inA Clockwork Orangeit takes on the form of language the spoken word All societies have their constraints, though breaking through them is often difficult What the poor disaffected youth do here is create their own system of communication that is so utterly theirs. Every word carries history, and by destroying such words the youngster are proposing a break from tradition they are proposing something new This idea is captured when they attack the bourgeoisie professor in the opening scene they beat...

  6. Henry Avila says:

    In the near future in an Utopian socialist country, England where everyone has to work except the ill or old whether the job makes any sense or not, a group of teenagers like to party without limits at night Alex the leader, George 2nd in command, Pete the most sane and the big dim Dim, he s good with his boots, fun loving kids Your humble narrator Alex, will tell this story my brothers First they see an ancient man leaving the library carrying books, very suspicious nobody goes there no In the near future in an Utopian socialist country, England where everyone has to work except the ill or old whether the job makes any sense or not, a group of teenagers like to party without limits at night Alex the leader, George 2nd in command, Pete the most sane and the big dim Dim, he s good with his boots, fun loving kids Your humble narrator Alex, will tell this story my brothers First they see an ancient man leaving the library carrying books, very suspicious nobody goes there now, inspecting these filthy things and ripping them to pieces, not forgetting a few punches on the of...

  7. Jonathan Ashleigh says:

    This book was sweet The way russian was used to show the distopian future was one of the coolest literary devices I have seen Because I was so enthralled by it, I often read partsthan once to make sure I was getting the meaning right Everyon...

  8. Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    437 A Clockwork Orange Anthony BurgessA Clockwork Orange is a dystopian novel by English writer Anthony Burgess, published in 1962 Set in a near future English society featuring a subculture of extreme youth violence, the teenage protagonist, Alex, narrates his violent exploits and his experiences with state authorities intent on reforming him The book is partially written in a Russian influenced argot called Nadsat 2002 437 A Clockwork Orange Anthony BurgessA Clockwork Orange is a dystopian novel by English writer Anthony Burgess, published in 1962 Set in a near future English society featuring a subculture of extreme youth violence, the teenage...

  9. Michael Finocchiaro says:

    Like many I suppose, I saw Kubrick s film long ago without having read the book until now Part punk rock version of Finnegans Wake, part scalding criticism of UK society in the 50s, Burgess dystopian Center is a real horrorshow in a non ACO interpretation of the word of violence Alex is a terrifying character every bit as evil as the Joker or Anton Chigurh whose state sponsored brainwashing is equally disturbing The prison chaplain s pleas for free choice tend to exemplify the theme of Like many I suppose, I saw Kubrick s film long ago without having read the book until now Part punk rock version of Finnegans Wake, part scalding criticism of UK society in the 50s, Burgess dystopian Center is a real horrorshow in a non ACO interpretation of the word of violence Alex is a terrifying character every bit as ev...

  10. Dean the Bibliophage says:

    What s it going to be then, eh Leave your domy house to borrow from the public biblio, or reach inside your carman for a bit of cutter Then, O my brothers, feast your glazzies on a dobby choodessny little novel You ll smeck your gulliver off and platch at the strack Itty bedways on your oddy knocky and let s nachinat critique of this zammechat raskazz A Clockwork Orange, the dystopian cult classic written by Anthony Burgess and published by William Heinemann in 1962, is a book which addresse What s it going to be then, eh Leave your domy house to borrow from the public biblio, or reach inside your carman for a bit of cutter Then, O my brothers, feast your glazzies on a dobby choodessny little novel You ll smeck your gulliver off and platch at the strack Itty bedways on your oddy knocky and let s nachinat critique of this zammechat raskazz A Clockwork Orange, the dystopian cult classic written by Anthony Burgess and published by William Heinemann in 1962, is a book which addresses violence in postmodern society, morality and human choice The novel is set in the not too distant future and n...

  11. Lisa says:

    It s funny how the colors of the real world only seem really real when you watch them on a screen There are these dystopian visionary books that slowly but steadily move from speculative fiction into the field of painfully realistic portrayals of life as we know and suffer it Huxley, Orwell and Atwood all saw our ordeal coming, and they created the mood and terror for our era long before we could follow their tracks in the daily news spit out in vicious bits and pieces.Recently a retired teac It s funny how the colors of the real world only seem really real when you watch them on a screen There are these dystopian visionary books that slowly but steadily move from speculative fiction into the field of painfully realistic portrayals of life as we know and suffer it Huxley, Orwell and Atwood all saw our ordeal coming, and they created the mood and terror for our era long before we could follow their tracks in the daily news spit out in vicious bits and pieces.Recently a retired teacher said to me that nobody could have predicted the generation of students we have to deal with today, who float above and beyond the rules that we try to convey to them be it orthography, vocabulary, democratic processes, newsworthiness of information, priorities for action and life plan...

  12. J.L. Sutton says:

    Anthony Burgess s A Clockwork Orange is a fantastic, thought provoking and immersive read Don t be put off by the invented slang It comes very easily once you begin reading, and adds to the experience Besides recommending this book, I do have a final thought concerning chapter 21, the chapter which was left out of the published American edition of the novel as well as the iconic film by Stanley Kubrick I understand Burgess s desire to show change in his young anti hero, Alex however, the tr Anthony Burgess s A Clockwork Orange is a fantastic, thought provoking and immersive read Don t be put off by the invented slang It comes very easily once you begin reading, and adds to the experience Besides recommending this book, I do have a final thought concerning chapter 21, the chapter which was left out of the published American edition of the novel as well as the iconic film by Stanley Kubrick I understand Burgess s desire to show change in his young anti hero, Alex however, the transformat...

  13. Gabrielle says:

    I once had a truly lovely roommate In my mind, I now think of her as the Yoga Bunny yes, because she was a yoga instructor, but also because she was the kind of adorable hippy who wants to believe that deep down, everyone is nice and that if you love one another enough, the world s problems will eventually solve themselves She was kind, generous and polite to a fault and I do not mean to make fun of her I really love her very much, but her world view always seemed terribly na ve and somewhat I once had a truly lovely roommate In my mind, I now think of her as the Yoga Bunny yes, because she was a yoga instructor, but also because she was the kind of adorable hippy who wants to believe that deep down, everyone is nice and that if you love one another enough, the world s problems will eventually solve themselves She was kind, generous and polite to a fault and I do not mean to make fun of her I really love her very much, but her world view always seemed terribly na ve and somewhat delusional to me I may be a cynic, but it really struck me like a ton of bricks one evening, when she was looking...

  14. MJ Nicholls says:

    A favourite of my late teens, still a favourite now The brutality of male blooming and the private patois of our teenhoodsplattered across this brilliant moral satire, abundant in vibrant, bursting language and a structural perfection Shakespearean, dammit Goddamn Shakespearean nadsat is second only to the language in Riddley Walker for a perfectly rendered invented language that is consistent within the novel s own internal logic This book is musical This book sings, swings, cries A favourite of my late teens, still a favourite now The brutality of male blooming and the private patois of our teenhoodsplattered across this brilliant moral satire, abundant in vibrant, bursting language and a structural perfection Shakespearean, dammit Goddamn Shakespearean nadsat is second only to the language in Riddley Walker for a perfectly rendered invented language that is consistent within the novel s own internal logic This book is musical This book sings, swings, cries and rages Oh this book, this book My first encounter with unbridled creativity,...

  15. Lindsay says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here I m updating this after reading Burgess autobiography, You ve Had Your Time He did write the book after WWII he was a pilot While he was away, his wife claimed that she had been gang raped by four American GIs who broke into their home Burgess wavers in his belief of this event taking place the perpetrators were never found He also frequently accuses his wife of cheating on him and expresses an intense desire to cheat on her with younger women He also spends a great deal of time slamm I m updating this after reading Burgess autobiography, You ve Had Your Time He did write the book after WWII he was a pilot While he was away, his wife claimed that she had been gang raped by four American GIs who broke into their home Burgess wavers in his belief of this event taking place the perpetrators were never found He also frequently accuses his wife of cheating on him and expresses an intense desire to cheat on her with younger women He also spends a great deal of time slamming Stanley Kubrick I m not a huge Kubrick fan, but I kind of wanted to just slap Burgess and say, so you didn t like his adaptation of your book, stop whining and deal with it It s believed that Burgess wrote A Clockwork Orange as a way of coping with what happened to his wife he seems to confirm this in his autobiography However, this further increases my dislike...